Five things we learnt from Rio 2016


Via the International Paralympic Committee

At Rio 2016 boccia featured many familiar faces from London 2012 but the results were different. Here is what we learned from the sport after Rio 2016:

1. Yuk Wing Leung is back on top

After failing to reach the podium at the London 2012 Paralympics, Hong Kong’s Yuk Wing Leung avenged himself by winning the mixed individual BC4 title. He won the 2014 World Championship and surged to the No. 1 ranked spot. However, he did not reach the 2016 World finals, showing the stiff competition in the category.

But at Rio 2016, Leung faced many close matches to pull through to the finals. He faced Slovakia’s Samuel Andrejcik in an exciting gold medal match, where Leung triumphed 4-3. Leung scored twice in the final end to secure his first medal since Beijing 2008 and individual gold since Athens 2004.

2. Thailand powerhouse

Thailand claimed five medals (two golds), winning every medal event they competed in including the individual BC2 match which was an all-Thai showdown. Compatriots Worawut Saengampa and Watcharaphon Vongsa dueled for the gold, and it was Saengampa who defeated the defending world champion 5-4. The pair joined forces in the mixed team BC1-2 gold medal match and beat Japan for the title.

Pornchok Larpyen surrendered only one point to South Korea’s Hyeonseok Seo to capture the individual BC4 bronze medal match. Larpyen was also key in the mixed pair BC4 bronze medal comeback success over Great Britain.

Four years ago at London 2012, Thailand took home two gold medals.

3. New pairs BC4 leaders

Brazil’s Eliseu Dos Santos and Jose Dirceu Pinto have dominated the pairs BC4 category since teaming up in 2007. They took gold at both London 2012 and Beijing 2008, and were the heavy favourites to complete a hat-trick at their home Games.

However, the Slovakian team of Andrejcik, Robert Durkovic and Michaela Balcova, entering No. 5 ranked in the world, upset the Brazilian crowd. The reigning European champions, scored in each of the last two ends, whereas Brazil failed to secure points. This could spell the beginning for Slovakia and the end of the Brazilian’s reign.

4. South Korea has a wealth of talent

South Korean athletes competed in six medal events claiming two medals highlighting the continuing development of the sport in the country. Their biggest victory and lone gold came from Ho Won Jeong in the individual BC3, where he dominated Greece’s Grigorious Polychronidis 8-1. It was Jeong’s first individual gold after three Paralympic Games appearances.

South Korea’s other medal came from Games debutant Won Jong Yoo, who took bronze in the BC1.

5. David Smith dominates the BC1

After taking silver at his home Games, Great Britain’s David Smith bounced back to reclaim gold in the individual BC1. He had pretty much dominated every opponent he faced, with the exception of Thailand’s No. 1 ranked Pattaya Tadtong – the very player whom Smith lost the gold to at London 2012. At Rio 2016, the two met in the quarter finals that went into a tiebreak. After getting past Tadtong, Smith cruised in his finals with a 5-0 victory over the Netherlands’ Daniel Perez.

Eastleigh’s David Smith hopes to boost Boccia’s profile after winning Paralympic gold


Via the Southern Daily Echo

DAVID Smith his hoping to boost Boccia’s profile after winning an individual gold medal at the Paralympics.

The 27 year-old won the 51st of GB’s 64 gold medals – while sporting a blue mohawk.

He received a letter of congratulation from the Mayor of Eastleigh after scooping individual gold in the Boccia BC1 class.

David, who was born, raised and educated in Eastleigh and is now at University in Swansea, built on his team gold in Beijing and silver in London with GB’s first Boccia medal in Rio.

After dominating the final, winning 5-0 against Holland’s Daniel Perez, he said: “I had lots of chances and didn’t take as many as I would have wanted.

“It could have been a hatful but it wasn’t.

“At least I won the game and proved I can beat anyone in the world.”

Smith’s gold was one of 11 won by GB on the Rio Paralympics’ penultimate day.

He has since discussed his desire to boost Boccia’s profile with Sports Secretary Tracey Crouch.

“Hope she can help me push Boccia!,” he tweeted.

Crouch replied: “Don’t worry Smithy, I was there when you got your #gold and already convinced about what we need to do!!!!”

Mayor of Eastleigh, Cllr Des Scott, has written a letter of congratulation to David, who is already a Freeman of the Borough, for his sporting achievement.

The Mayor said: “We were all cheering David and the team on in Rio.

“To win another Paralympic gold and is a tremendous achievement and I congratulate David on his superb gold medal victory.”


Paralympics: No medals, but Boccia players Nurul and Toh surpass expectations



SINGAPORE – A handful of fans were at Changi Airport to welcome Boccia players Nurulasyiqah Mohammad Taha and Toh Sze Ning back home from the Rio Paralympic Games on Tuesday (Sept 20) afternoon.

The duo might have returned home empty-handed from Rio, but the crowd support they had received in Brazil left the biggest impression on them.

Their eyes lit up with excitement when they recalled how they were cheered on by boisterous crowds who did Mexican waves at the Carioca Arena, the Boccia competition venue.

Nurul, who also took part in the 2012 London Paralympics, said: “I felt like I was at the (football) World Cup. The spectators were so loud and expressive when they cheered. I’ve never experienced that kind of atmosphere before.”

Toh, 23, who was making her Paralympics debut, said: “It felt like a soccer match. The crowd made it very exciting.”

The pair were greeted at the arrival hall by their family members and sports officials, including Singapore National Olympic Council president Tan Chuan-Jin.

Nurul and Toh earned the Republic’s best result in the sport at the Paralympics when they made it to the BC3 mixed-pairs bronze medal playoffs, following upsets over higher-ranked opponents Portugal and Greece.

But they eventually lost 1-8 to Greece to narrowly miss out on winning Singapore’s first Paralympic medal in the sport.

The team’s coach Tess Tan noted: “Greece were really on form on that day. They brought their A+ game and we didn’t bring our A game. But overall, we are quite satisfied with our results as we met the goal which we had set out to achieve.”

Nurul, 31, said: “We are sad, of course, but we have surpassed people’s expectations. We also felt surprised and a bit overwhelmed when we beat the higher-ranked teams, which sent a message to other teams that we can win if we put in 100 per cent of our efforts.

“I’m proud of what we have achieved and we have no regrets knowing that we are now the fourth best team in the world.”

Toh said: “I felt disappointed because we came so close yet so far (to winning a medal). But I am glad that we finished in the top four.”

It appears that missing out on a medal has made them even hungrier to go one step further at the Games’ next edition.

Even though Nurul will return back to her job as an auditor after taking a two-year, no-pay leave to prepare for Rio, she is already eyeing a medal at the Tokyo 2020 Paralympics.

She joked: “So this means that I cannot retire yet right? The work is not finished yet. I will be back for Tokyo. For me, I’ve always planned in blocks of four years before the next cycle continues. We need to plan now for the next four years.

“This Paralympics is not the end. We are now ranked fourth and it is another step in our progress.”

Are we in the middle of a Boccia Boom?

4 cutting edge technologies helping to improve your Boccia game

DEMAND Design & Manufacture for Disability have been making Boccia ramps in the UK for over 14 years. Starting with custom designs and one-off requests from special needs schools and colleges, eventually there were so many enquiries that the team created a range of ramps available for anyone to buy. Since then, these assistive ramps have enabled hundreds of people with complex and severe disabilities to enjoy Boccia.

DEMAND Boccia Lite ramp

Thanks to the innovative technology in DEMAND’s workshops, the go-to ramp for Boccia beginners, the Boccia Lite, is more accurate and versatile than ever. It is the first ramp to feature DEMAND’s innovative precision engineered ‘V’ channel, proven to keeps the ball on a straight trajectory when travelling down the ramp and onto the court.

Here’s a look at the cutting edge technologies helping you play at your best with the new Boccia Lite:

1. Rapid prototyping

In depth testing of the Lite’s new design was key to developing such an accurate ramp. By using a 3D printer to create scale models, many different designs could be tested quickly (using very tiny boccia balls we imagine!). Using these scale models, the team at DEMAND were able to develop a new ball holder which works even at the steepest ramp angles, allowing for more powerful and faster shots on the court.

3d printer video clip

2. Computer aided design and manufacture

With just the click of a mouse, this computer controlled (CNC) router can cut almost any 3D shape. It’s been used to create a mould that will be used to make thousands of Boccia Lite ramps, and it’s accurate to within just ⅓ of a millimetre. A precise mould makes for a precise ramp after all!
CNC Router machine cutting a boccia ramp mould

3. Vacuum forming

Each ramp is made by heating and forming a sheet of durable plastic. Manufacturing in this way means the ramp gains rigidity and additional features can be included, like the integrated ball rest and indexing edge for the add-on extension, while still being lightweight and durable enough to throw in the back of the car.

Vaccum forming machine making DEMAND Boccia LIte ramps

4. CNC Trimming

The final stage in each ramp’s journey through the workshop is trimming. Using a computer-controlled machine means every ramp is finished with the highest degree of precision, with smooth edges every time. From here, ramps are cleaned and then adorned with their stickers before being packaged and shipped to their new owners in all corners of the world!

CNC Router trimming a DEMAND Boccia Ramp

Boccia ramps from DEMAND are available to buy online in DEMAND’s shop.

DEMAND can also help with modifications to your ramp. Tweet them @DEMANDcharity or get in touch via DEMAND’s website.

Spotlight on Jamie & Scott McCowan

_77851380_scottmccowan (1)
Scott McCowan competes at the London 2012 Paralympics

Scott and Jamie McCowan are brothers who’ve both been selected to represent the UK at the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games. They’ll be competing for gold in the Boccia championship, which starts on the 7th of September.

The brothers play in the BC3 Boccia classification, and use an assistive ramp to propel each ball onto the court. We spoke to Scott and Jamie about their journey to Rio.

When did your journey to Rio begin?

Scott: “I’ve been competing now for 10 years almost. I’ve always been a BC3 whereas Jamie was a thrower for a long time, he’s recently transitioned to the BC3 class”

Jamie: “I’ve been playing for 10 years but i’ve been using the ramp for a year and a half.”

You’ve been using your ramp for a year and a half and you’ve already qualified for Team GB?

Jamie: “It’s been a quick change you could say! It’s been a quick turnaround for me but it’s been a great learning experience also.”

“I always thought ‘i’ll not be able to do it’. I was a thrower at the time and I couldn’t throw that far. I knew that I wouldn’t be able to reach the back of the court, I didn’t know anything about ramps.”

How did you first get involved with Boccia?

Scott: “I went to a multi-sports event for disabled people in my local area trying a number of sports. The boccia coach was there at the time. I always thought ‘i’ll not be able to do it’. I was a thrower at the time and I couldn’t throw that far. I knew that I wouldn’t be able to reach the back of the court, I didn’t know anything about ramps. The coach asked for me at a few events, I eventually gave in and gave it a try, I got hooked from there.”

Jamie: “I wasn’t familiar with the sport of Boccia. I tried it thinking this could be fun, we could enjoy it.”

Scott: “We joined the Scotland squad and never looked back.”


Jamie McCowan carries the Olympic torch in 2012

Scott competed in 2012 at the Paralympic games in London, so we asked how he expects Rio to be different.

S: “It’ll obviously be different from London, being a home games is such a special experience. One big difference will be the change in the crowd support, in London almost everybody was supporting team GB whereas this time it’ll be mostly brazilian supporters you would think. It’s a different continent, a different part of the world, a different culture, but at the same time it’s still a Paralympic games.”

“It’s just about trying to keep it in perspective, it’s just another event, but it’s certainly going to be different to my experience in London.”

Rio will be Jamie’s Paralympic debut, so we asked what advice he’d gotten from his brother.

J: “The thing I want to remember is that I don’t think it’s good to go in thinking you know what to expect. But when you step out onto the court, nothing’s changed, it’s the same game once you’re out there.”

S: “The biggest thing, enjoy it first of all. You get shocked by it in the first few days, try and get all the wonder and excitement out of the way and get into the competition mode, you’ve got to try to knuckle down and keep it in perspective – you’re there to do a job.”

“I don’t think anything can really prepare you until you get out there and experience it.”

“we know we’re good enough to beat all the teams. It’s just about doing it on the day.”

Who are you not looking forward to coming up against?

S: “Our biggest rivals are going to be Korea. They’re the world number one pair. They are the only team we haven’t beaten in competition yet, every other team we have beaten at some point.”

“We know that’s probably going to be the greatest test, but the way we’ve been training this year we know we’re good enough to beat all the teams. It’s just about doing it on the day.”

J: “The way we’ve played recently we know we can achieve what we want, that’s the most important thing. I think if you have that confidence and belief in what you’re doing for every single game then you can win. It’s exciting that we’re at that stage and putting the finishing touches on. We just want to get out there and perform to the best of our ability now.”

The brothers say their rivalry helps “keep the competitive juices flowing”

S: “I think obviously [Jamie]’s important to me for the pairs event, but once it gets into the singles…”

J: “It’s every man for himself!”

“It’s about not letting your disability set your limits”

Something that’s been making headlines ahead of Rio is Channel 4’s Superhumans campaign – what do you think of it?

J: “I think it’s fantastic, we’ve seen it lots and I just think what they’re doing spreading the word is inspiring. After London the Paralympics has taken off even further and the fact that they’re still spreading that positive message has meant no momentum got lost.”

S: “The great thing about it is that they’ve not focused only on sport, which is important because it’s not just about sport its so much more than that actually. It’s not just about ‘can you do sport?’, it’s from a musical perspective, are you good at your job, do you excel in so many different aspects of life? For us it’s great that they’re spreading a positive message, it doesn’t mean people have to get involved in sport, there’s so many aspects of life you can say, ‘Yes you can’ do what you want. You don’t have to have it decided for you because you have a disability that means you’re not suited to something that you’re passionate about.”

J: “Though we’re very sports driven and that’s what our lives revolve around, It’s about not letting your disability set your limits.”

“I don’t think there’s a better feeling. My first tournament win was 8 and a half years ago and now still feels the same.”

What motivates you to compete at this elite level?

J: “To me it’s the feeling of winning. With sport it’s a lot of hard work, a lot of sacrifices have been made but when you go to a tournament and you’ve stuck to your plan, you’ve won your tournament or won medals I don’t think there’s a better feeling. My first tournament win was 8 and a half years ago and now still feels the same.”

S: “What drives us to keep getting better is the inspiration to be better than the next guy, we’re competitive animals and that’s why we’re involved in the sport. If you don’t do well you get that motivation to try and do well the next time.”

What would be your advice to a player looking to make into Team GB for Tokyo 2020?

J: “One of the key things is don’t ever feel that there’s nothing to learn. You’ve really got to put the hours in if it’s something you want to do. You make those sacrifices and you can achieve whatever you want to in sport.”

S: “The hard work and dedication is the important bit. You have to make it your soul focus in terms of your training. I would say the biggest thing is to look to the person that’s competing above you, look at what they do and say to yourself, well if they’re doing better than me and they’re doing this maybe I could try it and you do that at every level.”

What about someone wanting to get involved with Boccia for the first time, what advice would you give them?

J: “People starting the game don’t know where to go and where to get the best ramps, so it’s great for organisations like yourselves to provide them, it’s crucial.”

S: “If you don’t have an effective ramp you’re just not going to be able to compete with some of the top guys.”

J: “Maybe the way you could perform with a better ramp isn’t the way you are performing with your current ramp. Even the quality of our ramps in recent years have changed dramatically. We’ve put a lot of work into that, if you‘ve got people outside of the squad doing that and potential athletes, trying to make adjustments and changes [to their ramps] it’s going to make it even more competitive.”


Scott McCowan and the GB squad at the London 2012 victory parade

So you’re feeling ready for Rio?

S: “We’ve done all the training that we need to do, were definitely ready to go out and do it so it’s just about staying ready at this point.”

We wish Jamie, Scott and the whole of the GB squad the best of luck going for gold at Rio. We’ll be sharing the results here on Boccia News as soon as they come in.

If you’re looking to get involved with Boccia as a beginner, or to improve your skills like Scott and Jamie, assistive ramps to suit every ability designed and made in house by DEMAND Design & Manufacture for Disability are available here.

Four Argentinian Boccia athletes head to Rio


Via Paradeportes

The Argentina Selection boccia already has four athletes who will represent us at the Paralympic Games in Rio: Mauricio Ibarbure (BC1), Sebastian Gonzalez, Luis Cristaldo and Maria Esther Sahonero (BC2). “I chose a functional team that has players who are physically well profiled in this category, with plenty of power and, above all, accurate , ” said Paul IOCCA, the national coach.

“The goal of minimum Argentina is passing the knockout stage and reach the semifinal , ” said IOCCA, who took the concentration of the national team in the Cenard to adjust details.

Boccia (4) : Mauricio Ibarguren, Sebastián González, Luis Cristaldo and Mary Esthe Sahonero.

Via Paradeportes

Six selected for Canada’s Paralympic Boccia team

LONDON, ENGLAND 09/06/2012  Marco Dispaltro competes in the 1/8 finals of the individual Boccia BC4 at the London 2012 Paralympic Games at the Excel.  (Photo by Daniel Marcotte/Canadian Paralympic Committee)

LONDON, ENGLAND 09/06/2012 Marco Dispaltro competes in the 1/8 finals of the individual Boccia BC4 at the London 2012 Paralympic Games at the Excel. (Photo by Daniel Marcotte/Canadian Paralympic Committee)

Via the International Paralympic Committee

MONTREAL, Que. – July 18, 2016 – Boccia Canada and the Canadian Paralympic Committee are proud to announce the six boccia athletes nominated for selection to Team Canada for the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games this September.

Team Canada’s boccia players bring a powerful mix of youth and experience. Four of the six will be competing in Rio in their first Paralympic Games, while veterans Marco Dispaltro and Paul Gauthier bring Paralympic Games experience to the team. Dispaltro won bronze at the London 2012 Paralympic Games, while Rio will mark the sixth Paralympic Games for Gauthier, who won gold in 2004 and two bronze in 2000.

“Canada has won medals in boccia at the last four Paralympic Games, so it’s a tradition we hope continues in Rio,” said Chef de Mission Chantal Petitclerc. “There are some excellent leaders and accomplished athletes in this sport who have been able to deliver consistent success across their program.”

The Canadian team represents some of boccia’s finest international athletes, with half of the players ranked in the top-20 in the world. With two silver medals last month (Dispaltro and Levine in pairs, Eric Bussiere in singles) at the final pre-Paralympic World Open in Povoa de Varzim, Portugal, the team is primed for a strong performance in Rio.

The emergence of budding stars Iulian Ciobanu, Alison Levine, Eric Bussiere and Marylou Martineau is a testament to the growth of this sport.

“All six athletes are a pleasure to work with, they are confident and they look forward to facing the challenges of the Paralympic Games,” said head coach Mario Delisle. “The last performance for many of these athletes at the international level looked great and I can feel everyone’s excitement. Some important fine tuning work is ahead in July and August, ensuring our team will be a force to reckon with in September.”

The team includes athletes in the BC4 classification, for athletes who are able to throw, and athletes in the BC3 classification who play using a ramp. In both classifications, Canada will compete in the individual and pairs divisions.

“Congratulations to the Boccia Canada athletes nominated to join Team Canada for the upcoming Rio 2016 Paralympic Games,” said the Honorable Carla Qualtrough, Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities. “Canada has a proud tradition of being a fierce competitor in boccia and I know our athletes are eager to continue to write that story this summer in Brazil. All of Canada is behind you.”

Boccia is a precision ball game, similar to bocce and lawn bowls. It is a simple game to learn, but difficult to master. With over 50 countries participating and the level of play increasing all the time, medals in Rio will be harder to come by than ever before.

The Rio 2016 Paralympic Games take place September 7 to 18. Boccia team and pairs competition begins on September 11 and individual play commences on September 16.

The athletes nominated to the Canadian Paralympic Team are as follows:
Eric Bussiere (Arthabaska, Que.)
Paul Gauthier (Vancouver, B.C.)*
Marylou Martineau (Québec City, Que.)

Alison Levine (Montreal, Que.)
Marco Dispaltro (Montreal, Que.)*
Iulian Ciobanu (Montreal, Que.)

*Denotes athletes with previous Paralympic Games experience

The nominated team will be supported by the following coaching staff:
Head Coach Mario Delisle (Montreal, Que.)
BC4 Coach César Nicolaï (Montreal, Que.)

Via the International Paralympic Committee

Stephen McGuire’s Rio 2016 Paralympic hopes

Via the Daily Record

World boccia champion Stephen McGuire expects a ‘carnival’ atmosphere when the Paralympic Games start in Rio in September.

The Hamilton ace is part of a 10-strong boccia team that was announced by the British Paralympic Association (BPA), and although he has known for some time that he was heading to Rio, McGuire (32) admits the excitement is building.

“I knew three weeks before, because they need to leave room for appeals and things like that, but it has been rubber-stamped and that’s great to know,” said Stephen.

“It does increase the excitement. It has been an interesting week, as I got the news and I was straight down to London, where we heard a lot of inspirational and motivational speeches.

“We’re part of a wider team and it’s amazing. There were a lot of Scots there, including Gordon Reid who just won the wheelchair tennis at Wimbledon.

“When one person wins a medal the momentum grows and the camaraderie is amazing. There is that bond.

“When we go to play abroad as Team GB there are 10 of us, but there are over 200 athletes this time.”

Stephen anticipates some fierce competition in boccia, which runs from September 10-16 (the Paralympics runs from September 7-18), and is eager to get going.

“I’m looking forward to the atmosphere; London 2012 was pretty traditional and in my head at least Rio is going to be a carnival. I’m looking forward to the crowds, the atmosphere, and it will be great to be part of it.

“Boccia is really big over in Brazil, we’re going to be playing in a 10,000 all-seater stadium, and I’m told it will be full. I hope we get to play them, actually, because they’re really good.”

Reigning BC4 World champion and pairs BC4 European Pairs champion McGuire is confident of doing well in Rio, and is pleased with what he has accomplished thus far.

He said: “I think you have to be confident when you go into something like this.

“Personally, I’ve done very well this year; I’ve won the World Championship and the Czech Open, and I took bronze from the World Open in Portugal, so there will be chances there.

“This is my second Paralympic Games, and to be honest there is no greater privilege than to represent Great Britain.

“When I started out, my dream was to get to a Paralympic Games, but this is my second, and I’ve won medals at the highest level.

“At London 2012 I was so close to a Paralympics medal, and that’s what keeps me going, so hopefully this time I can achieve it.”

Team leader Matt Hammond said: “The team is as strong as it has ever been and these athletes have been pushed throughout the qualifications period to deliver the performance needed to secure their place.”

Via the Daily Record

GB Boccia team announced for Rio 2016


Via Paralympics GB

“Beijing and London were both completely different experiences, and I look forward to finding out what Rio has in store for me.”

“The standard of international competition continues to go up, but I’ve remained focused on my preparations to ensure I’m in the best possible place. I hope the country will get behind us and help supercharge the team to success.”
David Smith

Matt Hammond, Team Leader for GB Boccia, said: “Today’s announcement is a proud moment for me as team leader and I’m delighted to confirm our line-up for Rio. The team is as strong as it’s ever been and these athletes have been pushed throughout the qualification period to deliver the performances needed to secure their place on the team. I’d like to congratulate the athletes and their competition partners for all of their hard work up to this point and I believe we can pose a real threat to our rivals on the court in Rio.”

Today’s announcement takes the number of selected athletes to 215 from 19 sports.

Selected athletes are:

BC1 David Smith (competition partner: Sarah Nolan)
Home town: Eastleigh
Main training base: Swansea

BC2 Nigel Murray
Home town: Leamington Spa
Main training base: Warwick St Nicholas Park Leisure Centre

BC2 Joshua Rowe
Home town: Perth
Main training base: Stirling

BC2 Claire Taggart
Home town:
Main training base:

BC3 Patrick Wilson (competition partner: Kim Smith)
Home town: Edinburgh
Main training base: Edinburgh

BC3 Jamie McCowan (competition partner: Linda McCowan)
Home town: Dundonald, Ayrshire
Main training base:

BC3 Scott McCowan (competition partner: Gary McCowan)
Home town: Dundonald, Ayrshire
Main training base:

BC4 Stephen McGuire
Home town: Hamilton
Main training base: University of the West of Scotland

BC4 Kieran Steer
Home town: Crossgates, Fife
Main training base: Fife

BC4 Evie Edwards
Home town: Ipswich
Main training base: Ipswich

Via Paralympics GB